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Shri Hemchandracharya

Shri Hemchandracharya
Kalikalsarvagna Hemchandracharya made extraordinary contribution for a long spell of seven decades to varied fields like poetry and grammar, history and puran, yoga and spiritual knowledge, lexicon and poetics, renunciation and penance, self-restraint and self-discipline and the state welfare and popular welfare. During the last 1000 years, there is no other personality that can match his saintliness and literary output. Continue reading “Shri Hemchandracharya” »

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Maharaj Kumarpal

Maharaj Kumarpal
The life of Rajarshi (king with the attributes of a sage) Kumarpal symbolising bravery, justice and compassion and it is a glorious chapter in the saga of Jainism. Kumarpal, an apostle of non-violence, was a powerful monarch. As a man of exceptional talents, he had carved out a niche for himself not only in the history of Gujarat but of India and his life was full of some extraordinary events. Continue reading “Maharaj Kumarpal” »

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Shri Haribhadrasuri

Shri Haribhadrasuri
Acharya Haribhadrasuri, a great author with powerful personality, had written many books in Sanskrit and Prakrit. His versatile scholarship, unmatched knowledge, acute critical faculty and mastery of language have earned for him a distinguished place in the history of Indian literature. The 1444 books deemed to have been written by him are regarded as the most valuable treasure of knowledge of the Jain religion. He was the first commentator of the Agamas (Jain canonical literature) and through his books he blazed a new trail in meditation. Continue reading “Shri Haribhadrasuri” »

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Shri Anathi Muni

Shri Anathi Muni
Magadh King Shrenik Bimbisar set out for forest-outing riding a horse. As he entered Mandikuli garden, he saw a saintly person in meditation under a tree. He was surprised at the sight of such a pleasant face with glowing forehead and was impressed by the monk. The king wondered as to what heart-rending and shocking experiences of worldly life might have led him to forsake joys and pleasures of youthful life and resort to a saintly way of life dedicated to penance. Continue reading “Shri Anathi Muni” »

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Sadhvi Yakini Mahattara

Sadhvi Yakini Mahattara
Two disciples of Acharya Haribhadrasuriji, namely Hans and Paramhans were killed at the hands of followers of other religion. Acharyashri suffered great mental commotion. The shock of the killing of his loving disciples caused a sense of revenge in him. Acharyashri decided to kill 1444 students and lecturers of Bauddha Vihar by roasting them alive in boiling oil. Anger and revenge leave no place for discretion. Continue reading “Sadhvi Yakini Mahattara” »

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Sheth Motisha

Sheth Motisha
Jain religion cares not only for human beings but also for mute animals, especially ones which cannot fend for themselves and have become useless for any work. Cattle homes are set up for such animals where they are provided fodder and are looked after. When one thinks of such cattle-homes, one inevitably remembers the name of Sheth Motisha. Continue reading “Sheth Motisha” »

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Shri Prasannachandra Rajarshi


Once Lord Mahavir arrived in the city of Rajgruhi. He was accompained by the royal sage (Rajarshi) Prasannachandra. Rajarshi Muni used to execute severe penance simply by staring at the fire-emitting Sun, with his one leg up and both arms raised straight. Magadha king Shrenik was completely impressed by such severe penance and politely questioned Lord Mahavir, “O Lord, suppose this monk performing severe penance, passes away at this particular moment, what state would he achieve after his death?” Continue reading “Shri Prasannachandra Rajarshi” »

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Upadhyay Shri Yashovijayji

Upadhyay Shri Yashovijayji
If someone utters the word upadhyayji it would mean Shrimad Yashovijayji Upadhyay. ‘So says Upadhyayji’ is regarded as the final word and ultimate authority in scriptural matters. His contemporary monks regarded him as the sarvajna (omniscient) in matters of the scriptures and also as shrutkevali (scripture – omniscient). Author of more than 100 books in Sanskrit, Prakrut and Gujarati, he also earned the titles of Tattvavisharad and Kurchatsharda. Besides writing the books that were theoretical and academic, he composed poems that were immensely popular. As Shri Bhadrabahuswami was known as antim shrutkevali so also Upadhyayji can be regarded as antim shrutpargami (last knower of all Jain canonical scriptures). Since his time, there has been no other scholar as learned and competent as him. Continue reading “Upadhyay Shri Yashovijayji” »

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Puniya Shravak

Puniya Shravak
Puniya Shravak symbolized ideal worship and devotion. He was a devotee whose devotion was praised by Bhagwan Mahavir himself. A resident of Rajagriha he came under the spell of Mahavir’s discourses and began to practice aparigraha (abandonment of worldly possessions). He embraced poverty willingly and gave away all the wealth he had inherited from his father. He would be happy and contented with what he earned from making cotton threads. He believed that contentment had nothing to do with possessions, with wealth or acquisitiveness. It is simply a state of mind. Continue reading “Puniya Shravak” »

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Samprati Maharaj

Samprati Maharaj
Emperor Samprati, the grandson of Emperor Ashok, occupied a place of pride among the contemporary emperors. Emperor Ashok and his grandson Samprati endeavoured to propagate Indian culture throughout the world. Known as Indrapalit, Sangat and Vigatashok, Emperor Samprati was enthroned in 230 B.C., but he had been handling the administrative duties long before. Continue reading “Samprati Maharaj” »

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